Lumberton Public Library

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Web Wise Seniors Aging and Technology Newsletter, May 2011- eBooks

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Favorite eBook websites

In the past two years, ebooks and ebook readers have become hot topics in the library world, and it seems that interest is going to continue to escalate in the near future. Libraries need to stay current with new technologies in order to remain relevant to their constituencies. Although ebooks are not a new technology (they first were introduced in the 1970’s), new hardware, better pricing, excellent selections, and great marketing have increased their popularity.

Instead of discussing the advantages and disadvantages of ebooks, I believe it may be of more value to you to tell you about the ebook and ebook-themed websites I currently use to find free or low priced ebooks to sustain my personal reading habit. I enjoy finding bargains; I know you will too.

I obviously download ebooks from my local library’s digital collection. However, the items I want are not always available or are not a part of the digital collection. That is when my search begins.

If you are looking for an ebook and/or want to compare ebook prices, try Inkmesh.com. The Inkmesh website searches the websites of multiple ebook sellers for the item and comparison prices. If you search for a book or author in Inkmesh, it will list the websites and prices where the ebook is available.

If you read Science Fiction and Fantasy, I recommend Baen’s Free Library, http://www.baen.com/library/, to get free ebooks. (The free books tend to be the first of a series.) This website also has a very interesting article, by author Eric Flint, on why Baen and the authors participating in the free library would give away a selection of their books for free. Baen’s companion website, http://www.webscription.net/, offers the later books in the series and new Bean publications for reasonable prices.

Project Guttenberg, http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page, also has a large selection of ebooks for free. These books tend to be of a more “classical” nature, and most are out of copyright. Project Gutenberg is one of the best places to find ebooks and has a very large collection of free eBooks.

If you like to find deals where ebooks are on sale, the website, http://blog.booksontheknob.org/, is a great blog to follow. It notifies users about free or discounted ebooks available to Kindle, Nook, Kobo, and other ebook readers. The blog displays ebook deals both within the US and the UK.

My personal ebook reader is a Nook, so I have one last tip that only will apply to Nook users. You can use your Nook to shop Google Books for free ebooks. To do this, go to the Nook’s Shop icon. Click on search and Search for 0.00 (zeros, like the price $0.00). This will bring up a listing of Google’s free books which can be downloaded to the Nook. (Make sure you pick the ones that say FREE, because not everything that shows up is free.)

I have found that I love reading ebooks. It is now my preferred method of reading. (I won’t shun a printed book, but I do think long and hard about how much I really want to read the book, if I can’t get it in ebook format.) But, as much as I love reading ebooks, free ebooks are even better. Happy reading!